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Atlanta Area Creative Artists & Professionals

If you are a creative artist or entertainment industry professional in the Atlanta area, The Greenhouse has its very own chapter for you! Whether you are in the beginning stages of your careers or a long-time veteran, we offer resources, training, community events, and more to help navigate the Atlanta entertainment industry. Here, you can also get connected with other Atlanta arts & entertainment professionals!

With workshops, mentoring, and other resources, we offer a wealth of information that leads entertainment professionals toward healthy careers and community in the Atlanta area, helping them thrive creatively, relationally, spiritually, and professionally.

We also help college students & graduates explore the transition from college life to the industry. So no matter where you’re coming from, get plugged in with the Atlanta chapter of The Greenhouse!

Register for the next Greenhouse: Atlanta event here!

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Stephanie Purcell

Chapter President

Hi, I’m Steph, and I want to be the first to welcome you to The Greenhouse's Atlanta chapter! I am a Producer's Guild of America (PGA) producer and have had the opportunity to work in TV, Film, and Live Events all over the world! One of the best pieces of advice I can give anyone in this industry is to build a network of people you trust, who are rooting for you and encourage you in only the best ways possible. This industry can be lonely and cut-throat. That's why I love The Greenhouse and am so glad you found us! When I was starting out my career in Los Angeles, it was easy to feel overwhelmed and overlooked, and to get frustrated. Having a place to find positive, like-minded individuals along with supportive mentors, classes, and panels all in one place was just what I needed. So, when I moved to Atlanta, I wanted to make sure I brought that same community with me. I feel at home in this wonderful city – southern hospitality is not a myth! And with so many talented individuals already working here, I want to grow The Greenhouse and our reach to help others. Whether you're new to Atlanta or new to the industry, I want to help you find your way and encourage you as best as possible. If you want to get in touch with me to find out more about The Greenhouse: Atlanta and all we have to offer, email me at stephanie.purcell@greenhouseproductions.com!

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Navigation Session

These popular workshops explain how to navigate Atlanta's entertainment industry!

Hollywood Connect Resources

Resources

Here’s all the information you need for starting your entertainment career in Atlanta!

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FAQ's

Learn more about arriving and thriving in your professional entertainment career in Atlanta!

Our next Navigation Session

You can navigate the Atlanta entertainment industry, and to show you how, we’re hosting our Navigation Sessions!

Atlanta Connect regularly invites panels of experienced industry professionals to lead its popular Navigation Sessions, providing you with all the ideas, insights, and strategies you need for a comprehensive pursuit of your entertainment career.

These sessions are geared toward people just getting started in their creative careers and cover a wide variety of helpful topics, giving you the rare opportunity to ask plenty of questions, not to mention connecting with other people in the industry. Get equipped with the tools and knowledge you need to launch your career and meet others for business relationships and collaborative partnerships. Get your questions answered, get plugged in, and to know other people in the Atlanta entertainment industry.

Who are Navigation Sessions for?

If you're an actor, writer, producer, director, musician, editor, or any other creative professional who is considering a career in Hollywood or in the first two years of your career in the entertainment industry, the Navigation Sessions are for you!

What Topics will be Covered?

  • Transitioning to and getting started in Hollywood
  • Networking and building industry relationships effectively
  • Finding jobs in the entertainment industry
  • Getting an agent or a manager
  • Pitching and selling your screenplay
  • How to get the artistic training you need
  • Getting plugged in with entertainment organizations, creative groups, and even churches
  • And much, much more!

What Should I Bring?

  • Paper & pencil (or you know, your computer) or anything else to take good notes
  • Business cards
  • All the questions you have about launching a career in the entertainment industry!

Atlanta Entertainment Resources

Housing Resources – ATL

Looking for your next living space?

Local Organizations – ATL

Find the one for your discipline.

Professional Services – ATL

Other pros that serve creative pros.

Actor Resources – ATL

For that inner thespian trying to get out.

Writer Resources – ATL

It’s your story. Tell it.

Bookstores and Libraries – ATL

Where to get the latest entertainment info.

Free Stuff – ATL

The price is right.

Recommended Books

Here’s some good reading to get you started.

Websites

The best of the industry webernet.

Industry Software and Apps

Software for show biz.

Got Questions?

General Questions

The Greenhouse’s Atlanta Connect program exists to help people arrive, survive, and thrive in the entertainment industry. It is particularly for people who are either considering a move or already live in the Atlanta entertainment industry or who are in their first 1-2 years in the industry.
 
Our goal is to help those creative professionals grow emotionally, physically, spiritually, intellectually, creatively, and professionally.

You can get in touch with us on our Contact page, by email at info@greenhouseproductions.com or by mail at The Greenhouse, Attn: Atlanta Chapter, P.O. Box 3832, Valley Village CA 91617. You can also email our Atlanta Connect director, Stephanie Purcell, at stephanie@greenhouseproductions.com

We especially love fan mail. And care packages with homemade cookies.

Unfortunately, for legal reasons, we are not able to accept any unsolicited material. It’s our policy that we either return or discard without reading any such material we receive. If you are interested in submitting your material to us, please do so only via your agent, manager, or talent representative.

We do have a 'script review' service available under The Greenhouse's Creative Services.

Actually, you don’t! The way the entertainment industry is currently set up, there are lots of opportunities to get involved in the industry wherever you find yourself right now! With that said, in many ways, Atlanta is considered a great starting point with film, television, music, video games, new media, and many others offered here.
 
Although movies and television are shot around the world, there is a wide range of interests, careers, and levels within Atlanta.
A state tax credit was signed into law in 2008 giving productions up to a 30 percent tax break by filming in Georgia. This incentive was enough to convince Hollywood producers to film in Georgia. Big productions such as The Hunger Games, The Walking Dead and Divergent helped boost Georgia's film industry.
 
Which means that you have more room to grow and expand within your career here.

Arrive, Survive & Thrive

It would be tempting to think that the moment you step off the plane or bus you’ll be inundated with entertainment opportunities and that you’ll never have to watch your bank account run dry. Okay, it happens to people occasionally, but that’s rare, very rare. We recommend approaching your finances like you won’t be the exception to the rule.
 
Fortunately, Atlanta is a lot cheaper than LA or New York but you are still going to encounter a lot of costs that you didn’t necessarily anticipate: a deposit on an apartment, fees for registering your car, new headshots, and all sorts of other necessities.
 
It is always wise to save up some money before you get here.
 
There are a lot of opinions about how much you should have in the coffers, and it will have something to do with the standard of living you’re used to, but we recommend saving at least $5000 before you make the move. And a little more than that ain’t gonna hurt.

Finding your housing should be the first thing you do when you get to Atlanta. There is a tremendous amount of competition for affordable housing, and so it is likely it will take you some time find a place.

You can also visit our Housing Resources page to get a head start!

We’re certain you are very talented person, and with talent comes opportunities! But even when those opportunities come a-knocking, it still can take time for you to move your way up in the industry, and until that big break happens, you’re going to need a way to pay the bills! So typically, we recommend that you get a job that will make you some money at the same time you are pursuing your entertainment industry goals.

So what kind of job should you get? A lot of this depends on what your industry goals are. For actors who need a more flexible schedule to allow for unexpected auditions, a non-industry job that has that sort of flexibility will be important. However, for other types of creative professionals (such as producers and agents), it is better to get work in the industry itself to build up experience and relational networks in those areas of interest.

Some people worry that if they put a non-industry job on their resume they will be looked at funny when they finally land that incredible interview for the entertainment job. Typically, that’s not the case. Employers know that it takes time to find that right position, so they aren’t going to look down on you if you have a good non-industry job listed. Besides, it shows good work ethic, builds up professional references, and every once in a while, lets you buy those way-overpriced coffees you like so darn much.

PS: If you're a member of the Greenhouse Community you can search our job boards

You’ll hear all sorts of opinions on this topic and lots of stories about successful entertainment folks who did not get a college degree. But usually, having a college education is going to help you meet your entertainment industry goals. Having a college degree will not guarantee you a job, but most of the time, it will be a big plus. And in some types of entertainment jobs, you have to have the right degree. For example, you can’t be an entertainment attorney without graduating from law school.

But no matter what your discipline is, a good education is going to give you a strong foundation to build your career. The most important thing to know in terms of your education is that you must never stop learning, and you should encourage yourself to keep educating yourself with challenging new skills. Some of the most successful filmmakers still consider themselves “students of film” and even go back to college to get extra degrees.

So go get that college degree. Ninety-nine times out of 100, entertainment people are glad they did.

The most difficult parts of growing a career in the entertainment industry are often loneliness and discouragement. Maintaining a trusted circle of friends who will encourage you and always tell you the truth is extremely important.

Also, you’ll want to get plugged into your church or place of worship and creative organizations. (May we suggest The Greenhouse?) There are lots of organizations and opportunities for community out there, so find one that fits you the best! Definitely check out the Ministries Resource Page to find some good options. Whatever you do, don’t go at it alone!

We sometimes hear individuals say, “I’ll give it one year, and if I haven’t made it by then, I’ll go home.”

To those people, we reply, “Save yourself the heartache and find another career.” Developing an entertainment career takes a long time. This is a bit of a generalization, but we tell people that it will take at least 5 years to get an acting career off the ground. For writers, it’s even longer – as long as 10 years. So if you’re not willing to come for the long haul, it’s best that you choose a different path.

But keep in mind: you need to do what is best and healthiest for you, and that may be moving on. While we urge people to work hard in their careers, we also recognize the need to maintain a healthy life and healthy relationships. If leaving is something you’re considering, get in touch with us. We’ll help you work through the process of seeing whether you should stay or need to go back home or if there are other options available to you.

If it is time to move on to the next thing, do not think of that as failure! The greatest success you can have is to follow your true calling!

Actors

We get this question a lot! Unfortunately, we’re not able to find or provide an agent for you.

There are a number of ways for finding an agent, including the agency books that you can purchase at industry bookstores like Samuel French Bookstore.

These books are updated monthly, which will give you all the info you need to target those agents who are looking specifically for your “type.” And you’ll find that having a referral from another trusted actor is going to help in getting an agent.

There is a difference between the two. According to Georgia state law, only a licensed agent is permitted to get you work as an actor. However, managers are also good for developing contacts, working with marketing and publicity, and overall planning of your acting career. And remember, an agent will require 10% of your gross profits from any acting jobs s/he obtains for you, and a manager will require 15% of your gross profits for any jobs that you get.

You do not necessarily need to have both, although many actors have both. There are differing opinions as to which one is more important, however. The more important thing is to find representation that is getting the job done for you. Do your homework on potential agents and managers – find ones who are ethical, connected, and willing to work with your specific goals. It is okay to say “no” to those reps who aren’t.

There can be a number of reasons to say “no” to an acting job. You may not be comfortable with nudity, language, violence, other content, or even just the overall type of project with which you’ve been presented. It is okay to say a firm and polite “no” when you are presented with something you’re not comfortable with. In fact, it is the true professional who is strong enough to say “no” when he or she does not want to take a particular job.

Now, you may end up feeling pressure to take that job – pressure from others and/or from yourself. You may have to part company with your agent or manager. You may even be told that outrageous lie, “You’ll never work in this town again.” Don’t believe it. If you’re talented, you will find another agent and/or manager, and you will have opportunities to work in Hollywood again. In fact, you might even have more opportunities because you said “no.” We know all sorts of stories of people who said “no” to projects for various reasons – even saying it to the biggest names in Hollywood – and those people went on to the highest levels of success, even becoming A-list talent.

The truth is that the most powerful word you can say is “no,” and if you say it for the right reasons, you’ll actually have more respect. Sure, you might have to burn a bridge or two in the process, but if you’re good, that won’t stop you.

So say “no” for the right reasons, sleep with a clear conscience at night, and know that your career is in safe hands – yours, not someone else who isn’t truly looking out for you and your true goals.

Writers

We get this question a lot! Unfortunately, we’re not able to find or provide an agent for you.

There are a number of ways for finding an agent, including the agency books that you can purchase at industry bookstores like Samuel French Bookstore.

These books are updated monthly, which will give you all the info you need to target those agents who are looking specifically for your “type.” And you’ll find that having a referral from another trusted actor is going to help in getting an agent.

There is a difference between the two. According to Georgia state law, only a licensed agent is permitted to get you work as an actor. However, managers are also good for developing contacts, working with marketing and publicity, and overall planning of your acting career. And remember, an agent will require 10% of your gross profits from any acting jobs s/he obtains for you, and a manager will require 15% of your gross profits for any jobs that you get.

You do not necessarily need to have both, although many actors have both. There are differing opinions as to which one is more important, however. The more important thing is to find representation that is getting the job done for you. Do your homework on potential agents and managers – find ones who are ethical, connected, and willing to work with your specific goals. It is okay to say “no” to those reps who aren’t.

Ooh, sorry, you can’t. There is no way to copyright an idea.

But you can take steps to protect your script, treatment, or other materials. Check with the U.S. Copyright Office to get some info and an application (there is a small fee to file the application, but it’s worth it). Also consider filing your material with the Writers Guild of America, which provides additional protection and the ability to arbitrate any conflicts.

Well, that can happen, although it doesn’t happen as often as you might think. There are federal copyright laws that have been put in place in order to protect your work. While ideas cannot be exclusively owned, the way the idea is expressed can. Always register your script with the U.S. Copyright Office and/or the Writers Guild of America. We recommend registering at both. There are easy applications and low application fees.

Consult a licensed entertainment attorney if you have concerns.